Children’s Commissioner for England warns the same mistakes that led to child sexual exploitation are being repeated with gangs | Children’s Commissioner for England

Children’s Commissioner for England warns the same mistakes that led to child sexual exploitation are being repeated with gangs | Children’s Commissioner for England
— Read on www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk/2019/02/28/childrens-commissioner-for-england-warns-the-same-mistakes-that-led-to-child-sexual-exploitation-failings-are-being-repeated-with-gangs/

Hikikomori – a term seldom used and uncommon to most people but for some, psychologists are beginning to take more cognisance. “People Who Withdraw From Society For Months Or Years On End”

New Insights Into Hikikomori – People Who Withdraw From Society For Months Or Years On End – Research Digest
— Read on digest.bps.org.uk/2019/05/22/new-insights-into-hikikomori-people-who-withdraw-from-society-for-months-or-years-on-end/amp/

Fascinating update (study) ‘How Attachment Style Changes Through Multiple Decades Of Life.’ Spoiler alert: it is not all down to parents.

“Attachment theory, which was first proposed in the 1950s by the British psychoanalyst John Bowlby, is one of the most influential in psychology. It argues for the importance of our earliest relationships with our caregivers, and predicts that these formative bonds will shape the nature of our connections with other people for the rest of our lives. Remarkably, however, psychologists still know relatively little about how people’s attachment style – essentially their characteristic style of relating to other people – typically varies through life. “How do attachment orientations change across the life span? Unfortunately … this critical question has eluded researchers,” write William Chopik and colleagues in their recently published paper in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
— Read on digest.bps.org.uk/2019/05/09/first-study-to-investigate-how-attachment-style-changes-through-multiple-decades-of-life/amp/

Inspiring article ‘Jon Adams was aged 52 learnt learned he had Asperger syndrome. He and others explain the impact – The Guardian

Jon Adams was 52 when he learned he had Asperger syndrome. As adult referrals rise, he and others explain the impact – good and bad – of a late diagnosis
— Read on amp.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/19/autism-diagnosis-late-in-life-asperger-syndrome-john-harris